About The College

The mandate of the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC) is to protect the public. We ensure that the health and care professionals that we regulate (audiologists, dietitians, hearing instrument practitioners, occupational therapists, opticians, optometrists, physical therapists, psychologists, and speech-language pathologists) have the competencies needed to practice and that they adhere to the standards needed for safe and ethical care.

Our Regulatory Role

The emergence of the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC marks a pivotal evolution in healthcare regulation. The College was formed in June 2024 to amalgamate the regulation of a diverse group of health and care professionals: audiologists, dietitians, hearing instrument practitioners, occupational therapists, opticians, optometrists, physical therapists, psychologists, and speech-language pathologists.

This innovative amalgamation of regulatory bodies into a singular, powerful entity is rooted in the principles of public protection, education, and connection. It represents a commitment to excellence, efficiency, and inclusivity in processes such as public complaints, registration, and registrant quality practice.

At its foundation, the College is tasked with the critical mission of helping to safeguard public health by regulating these health and care professions to ensure they have the competencies needed to practice and that they adhere to the standards needed for safe and ethical care.

Through its dedication to protecting the public, the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC stands as a trusted authority, dedicated to acting in the public interest.

Other Regulatory Colleges in BC

Professions We Regulate

Audiologists

What is an Audiologist?

An audiologist is a health professional who provides, for the purposes of promoting and maintaining communicative, auditory and vestibular health, the services of assessment, treatment, rehabilitation and prevention of

  • auditory and related communication disorders and conditions
  • peripheral and central auditory system dysfunction and related peripheral and central vestibular system dysfunction.

Use of reserved titles

In B.C., only audiologists who are registered with the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC) can legally call themselves:

  • “Audiologist”
  • Or the abbreviation “RAUD”

Standards And Legislation

Audiologists in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Licence Verification

Search the Licence Verification form to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with CHCPBC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Audiologists must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Dietitians

What is a Dietician?

In B.C., dietitians provide nutrition care along the entire continuum of life – from before conception to end of life, including:

  • assessing nutritional needs of individuals and groups
  • using a client-centred approach to nutritional counselling
  • designing, implementing and monitoring nutritional care plans and therapeutic diets based on current and relevant scientific, medical and nutrition information
  • disseminating relevant scientific information about food and human nutrition to promote health and assist individuals, groups and communities in attaining, restoring or maintaining health
  • managing quality food service operations in health-care institutions, education facilities, and government agencies

Use of reserved titles

In B.C., only dietitians who are registered with the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC) can legally call themselves:

  • “Dietitian” or
  • “Registered Dietitian”.

Note: Nutritionists, holistic nutritionists, nutrition counsellors and other diet coaches are under no obligation to meet enforceable education and training standards in British Columbia.

Standards And Legislation

Dietitians in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Licence Verification

Search the Licence Verification form to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with CHCPBC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Dietitians must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Hearing instrument practitioners

What Is A Hearing Instrument Practitioner?

A hearing instrument practitioner provides the services of:

  • assessment of hearing using an audiometer, or other methods, to identify hearing loss
  • recommending, selecting, preparing, altering, adapting, verifying, selling and offering to sell hearing instruments.

Use of reserved titles

In B.C., only hearing instrument practitioners who are registered with the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC) can legally call themselves:

  • “Hearing instrument practitioner”
  • Or the abbreviation “RHIP”

Standards And Legislation

Hearing instrument practitioners in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Licence Verification

Search the Licence Verification form to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with CHCPBC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Hearing instrument practitioners must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Occupational therapists

What is an Occupational Therapist?

Occupational therapists are health care professionals who work with individuals, groups and communities across the life span, in a variety of settings. Occupational therapy is the art and science of enabling clients to resume, maintain and promote participation in the activities and tasks of everyday life, also known as occupations. These include things people do to look after themselves, to enjoy themselves, and to contribute to the social, cultural and economic systems within their communities.

Occupational therapists advance the health and wellbeing of their clients while striving to work actively to remove barriers to culturally safe, just, competent, equitable and ethical care.

Use of reserved titles

In B.C., only occupational therapists who are registered with the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC) can legally call themselves:

  • “Occupational therapist”
  • “OT.”

Standards And Legislation

Occupational Therapists in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Licence Verification

Search the Licence Verification form to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with CHCPBC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Occupational Therapists must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Opticians

What is an Optician?

Opticians are health-care professionals who:

  • dispense vision appliances, such as eyeglasses and contact lenses
  • use specialized skills, knowledge, and feedback from clients to determine what eyewear best suits their needs.

In addition, contact lens fitting is a restricted activity and independent automated refractions, known as sight-tests, can be performed by opticians who are certified to do so. Some opticians can provide these services, as they require additional training and registration or certification with the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC).

Use of reserved titles

In B.C., only opticians who are registered with CHCPBC can legally call themselves:

  • “Optician”
  • “ Contact lens fitter” (NOTE: An optician must complete additional training and hold an additional licence in order to use the title of “contact lens fitter”)

and all titles derived from these titles, such as “student optician,” “optical dispenser,” or “dispenser.” 

Standards And Legislation

Opticians in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Licence Verification

Search the Licence Verification form to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with the College of Health and Care  Professionals of BC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Opticians must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. Opticianry care must be provided in accordance with the Standards of Practice. CHCPBC has created the Standards of Practice: A Client’s Guide to help inform you of those expected standards. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Optometrists

What is an Optometrist?

In B.C., optometrists are health-care professionals who are trained to:

  • assess the health of the eye and visual system and how it relates to systemic health
  • diagnose refractive disorders and eye health disease
  • treat eye health disorders and diseases with appropriate medication or corrective eyewear.

An optometrist is likely the health-care professional you will see when you have eye health issues or problems seeing well.

Use of reserved titles

In B.C., only optometrists who are registered with the College of Health and Care Health Professionals of BC (CHCPBC) can legally call themselves:

  • “Optometrist”.

Standards And Legislation

Optometrists in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Licence Verification

Search the Licence Verification form to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with CHCPBC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Optometrists must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Physical Therapists

What is an Physical Therapist?

Physical therapists:

  • are registered health-care professionals who specialize in how the human body moves
  • treat people who have a loss of function from health conditions, injuries, or disabilities.

Use of reserved titles

In B.C., only physical therapists who are registered with the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC)  can legally call themselves:

  • “Physical therapist”
  • “Physiotherapist”
  • “Registered physical therapist”
  • “Registered physiotherapist”

Standards And Legislation

Physical therapists in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Licence Verification

Search the Licence Verification form to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with CHCPBC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Physical therapists must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Psychologists

What is a Psychologist?

Registered psychologists provide services to:

  • manage and enhance the cognitive, behavioural, emotional, interpersonal and physical functioning of individuals or groups of individuals, primarily by applying and using psychological assessment and intervention strategies, including psychometric testing and psychotherapy
  • assess and diagnose behavioural, emotional, cognitive, and mental disorders.

Psychologists typically focus their practice in specific areas such as clinical, counselling, forensic, health, rehabilitation or school psychology. Across these practice areas, psychologists engage in a broad range of activities including:

  • assessing and treating mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression
  • assessing and working with neurological conditions, such as brain injury or dementia
  • helping people address psychological factors and problems associated with physical conditions and disease (for example, diabetes, heart disease, stroke)
  • assessing cognitive functions, such as learning, memory, problem-solving, intellectual ability, and performance
  • providing court consultations addressing the impact and role of psychological and cognitive factors in accidents and injury, parental capacity, and competence to manage one’s personal affairs
  • assisting people struggling with stress, anger and other aspects of lifestyle management
  • treating marital and family relationships and problems
  • helping people to address addictions and substance use and abuse (for example, smoking, alcohol).

Use of reserved titles

In B.C., only psychologists who are registered with the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC) can legally call themselves unless exempted in the Psychologists Regulation:

  • “Psychologist”
  • “School psychologist”

Standards And Legislation

Psychologists in B.C. are governed under the following:

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Licence Verification

Search the Licence Verification form to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with CHCPBC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Psychologists must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

Speech-language pathologists

What is a Speech-Language Pathologist?

A speech-language pathologist is a health professional who provides, for the purposes of promoting and maintaining communicative health, the services of assessment, treatment, rehabilitation and prevention of:

  • speech, language and related communication disorders and conditions, and
  • vocal tract dysfunction, including related feeding and swallowing disorders

Use of reserved titles

In B.C., only speech-language pathologists who are registered with the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC) can legally call themselves:

  • “Speech-language pathologist”
  • “Speech therapist”
  • or the abbreviation “RSLP”

Standards And Legislation

Speech-language pathologists in B.C. are governed under the following::

as well as other provincial legislation applicable to health professionals.

Licence Verification

Search the Licence Verification form to verify that an individual is currently registered/licensed to practice with CHCPBC, and to see information about credentials and scope of practice.

Complaints

Speech-language pathologists must practice in a competent, safe and ethical manner. If you have concerns that the care you received does not meet the standards of practice, please share them with the College by filing a complaint.

CULTURAL SAFETY & HUMILITY

According to the First Nations Health Authority (FNHA):

Cultural safety is an outcome based on respectful engagement that recognizes and strives to address power imbalances inherent in the healthcare system. It results in an environment free of racism and discrimination, where people feel safe when receiving health care.

Cultural humility is a process of self-reflection to understand personal and systemic biases and to develop and maintain respectful processes and relationships based on mutual trust. Cultural humility involves humbly acknowledging oneself as a learner when it comes to understanding another’s experience.

On March 1, 2017, BC’s health regulatory colleges, signed the Declaration of Commitment – Cultural Safety and Humility in the Regulation of Health Professionals Serving First Nations and Aboriginal People in British Columbia. This declaration formalized their commitment to integrating cultural safety and humility into their practices as health profession regulators. 

Transformative changes to eradicate Indigenous-specific racism in the health-care system and to integrate cultural safety and humility into the College’s practices are a priority for the College. 

OUR COMMITMENT TO INDIGENOUS CULTURAL SAFETY, HUMILITY AND ANTI-RACISM

  • The College’s purpose is to ensure the public receives safe, ethical, and effective physical therapy services in British Columbia, as mandated by the Health Professions Act of BC. This includes physical therapy services provided to Indigenous clients, who are disproportionately subjected to stereotyping, racism, discrimination, and prejudice which is unsafe. CPTBC is therefore dedicated to Indigenous Cultural Safety, Humility and Anti-Racism in the regulation of physical therapy services in BC, which includes making room for decolonization within its culture, governance and operations. 

    To be antiracist involves eliminating racism from our policies and institutions, understanding how the present exists upon colonial and racist foundations, and committing to educate oneself and take action to create conditions of greater inclusion, equality and justice. 

    – In Plain Sight (PDF), 2020, p.7 

    Cultural humility is not a skill attained at one point in time. It is not a box that can be checked off and marked complete. Rather, it comes from a deep personal commitment to ongoing learning, continuous self-reflection and examination of personal biases. It is a willingness to listen, learn, and act to protect Indigenous human rights. It is a set of evolving skills that allows the healthcare provider to make room for decolonization and create a culturally safe space, which might look different for each individual client. 

    Statistics and research paint a distressing picture of our society, in which too many people are struggling with violence and trauma. These challenges exist against the historical backdrop of Canada’s colonization of Inuit Nunangat, in which federal government policy directed the institutions and systems that have destabilized our society by undermining our ability to be self-reliant. The social and cultural challenges that exist today can similarly be undone in large part through policies that support and empower Inuit institutions, families and communities. 

Territorial acknowledgement

The offices of the College of Health and Care Professionals of British Columbia are located on the ancestral and unceded territories of the Coast Salish Peoples — specifically, the xʷθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Swx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) and səlilwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations — the lək̓ʷəŋən (Lekwungen) Peoples — represented today by the Songhees and xʷsepsəm (Esquimalt) Nations — and the WSÁNEĆ (Saanich) Peoples — including the BOEĆEN (Pauquachin), SȾÁ,UTW̱ (Tsawout), W̱JOȽEȽP (Tsartlip), and W̱SÍEM (Tseycum) Nations.  

As the College regulates the practice of multiple health-care professions across what is now commonly referred to as British Columbia, we acknowledge and honour all First Nations territories across these lands. We recognize that the public we serve includes more than 200 distinct First Nations and 39 Métis Chartered Communities.  

We are conscious of the privilege we hold that allows us to carry out our important work on these territories, where the First Peoples have maintained a special relationship with the lands and waters for thousands of years — since time immemorial — and where this relationship continues today. 

Bylaws

The College’s Bylaws set out the details of the operation of the organization, including: 

  • the duties and responsibilities of a governing Board, Committees, and the Registrar 
  • qualifications for registration and licensing
  • the regulation of professional conduct and ethics
  • fee schedules.

Bylaws are enacted by the College’s Board and are subject to oversight by the Minister of Health. 

CHCPBC Bylaws

Our Board

The Board is responsible for leading the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC) and for ensuring the College fulfills its responsibilities set out in the Health Professions Act. Board members provide strategic leadership. They guide the direction of the organization, ensure it has the necessary resources, and monitors performance. The Board and Registrar/CEO work together to ensure that CHCPBC fulfills its mandate to protect the public.

The Board consists of six registrant members (not more than one member from each profession regulated by the College) and six public members. The members are appointed by the Minister of Health. Members are selected so that collectively they come from across the province, and bring diverse lived experience, expertise, and skills to the table.

Registrant members

  • Jennifer Agnew
  • Russell Ebata
  • Jamie Hack
  • Sue Randhawa
  • Deborah Ruggiero
  • Olivier Yergeau

Public members

  • Nathan Doidge
  • Joyce Kenoras
  • Sarah Lalonde
  • John Meneghello
  • Mary O’Callaghan
  • Allan Seckel (designated Board Chair)

Committees

Committees — some of which have a regulatory role and some of which support the Board — play a vital role in the College’s work.

Regulatory committees

Five regulatory committees were established under CHCPBC’s bylaws to support the core programs under our mandate. Committees are made up of a number of members of the public and registrants from each profession. Each committee has a matrix of the collective skills, knowledge and diversity that are ideal for the committee members to bring to the work of the panels. Click on the boxes below to read descriptions of the committees and their terms of reference.

Registration Committee

  • Supports entry to the profession by: approving policies about granting registration and reinstatement; making decisions on non-routine registration, renewal and reinstatement applications; and, putting limits and conditions on registrant practice. 
    • recognized educational institutions
    • entry-level examination
    • completion of a jurisprudence exam.Recommends to the Board any requirements for registration and certification, such as:Approves and oversees exams.

Registration Committee Terms of Reference

Quality Assurance Committee

  • Defines the desired outcome for and principles of a quality assurance program that promotes the safe, ethical and competent practice of all registrants.
  • Provides advice to staff developing and administering quality assurance programs.
  • Assesses the professional performance of registrants; appoints assessors; and, conducts quality assurance audits to confirm compliance.
  • Refers matters to the Inquiry Committee when it considers doing so is necessary to protect the public.

Quality Assurance Committee Terms of Reference

Inquiry Committee

  • Reviews complaints or other information that could result in an investigation.
  • Oversees the investigation process and appoints inspectors.
  • When determined to be necessary to protect the public during an investigation, the Committee makes orders for interim action, including imposing limits or conditions, or a suspension of registration.
  • For complaints referred to the Committee, determines the outcome from the statutory options, including:
    • dismissal with no further action;
    • requesting remedial or disciplinary action by agreement; or.
    • directing that a citation be issued for a hearing before the Discipline Committee.

Inquiry Committee Terms of Reference

Discipline Committee

  • Conducts discipline hearings of citations referred by the Inquiry Committee.
  • Conducts permit revocation hearings with respect to health professions corporations (HPCs).
  • Considers findings or admissions of unprofessional conduct by registrants while practising in other jurisdictions. 
  • When determined to be necessary to protect the public during a hearing, the Committee makes orders for interim actions, including imposing limits, conditions, or a suspension of registration.
  • Makes findings and determinations regarding the allegations in a citation. If allegations are proven, impose an appropriate penalty.
  • Provides written decisions.

Discipline Committee Terms of Reference

Professional Practice & Standards Advisory Committee

  • Advisory only. No statutory authority.
  • Provides advice and feedback to staff regarding developing practice and ethical standards and guidance.
  • Provids advice, feedback, and recommendations to the Board regarding which practice and ethical standards and guidance require Board approval.
  • Provides advice to the Board on any professional practice matter the Board requests.
  • Provides advice to staff regarding any professional practice matter the staff requests.
  • An avenue for the Board and/or staff to seek advice from Indigenous registrants and members of the public on professional standards and practice issues related to Indigenous-specific racism in the healthcare system.

Professional Practice & Standards Advisory Committee Terms of Reference

Board support committees

Three committees oversee and support the governance work of the College’s Board. These committees are made up of Board members as well as registrant and public members. Click on the boxes below to read descriptions of the committees and their terms of reference.

Governance Committee

  • Recommends Committee appointments.
  • Identifys Board gaps.
  • Recommends governance policies.
  • Oversees governance evaluations.
  • Oversees learning of Board and Committee members.
  • Ensures governance of the college enables commitment to anti-racism and Indigenous cultural safety.

Governance Committee Terms of Reference

Finance & Audit Committee

  • Advises the Board on financial administration matters.
  • Recommends financial policies.
  • Oversees enterprise risk management process.
  • Oversees budget and make recommendations to the Board regarding fees.
  • Facilitates audit process.
  • Oversees the college’s investment portfolio.
  • Ensures the college’s finances enable commitment to anti-racism and Indigenous cultural safety.

Finance & Audit Committee Terms of Reference

Human Resources Committee

  • Oversees the Registrar and CEO performance and compensation reviews.
  • Oversees emergency and long-term Registrar and CEO succession planning.
  • Assists the Board in fulfilling its governance oversight responsibilities with respect to the College’s human resources.
  • Ensures the College’s strategic human resources policies align with diversity, equity, and inclusion principles and enable the College’s commitment to anti-racism and Indigenous cultural safety.

Human Resources Committee Terms of Reference

Staff

Dianne Millette

REGISTRAR & CEO

Dianne was educated as a physical therapist. She has worked in health professions regulation for most of her career, including as Registrar of the College of Physical Therapists of BC, as well as holding positions at the College of Physiotherapists of Ontario and Physiotherapy Alberta – College + Association. Dianne is a member of the Board of Directors of the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators and International Network of Physiotherapy Regulators.

  • Cameron Cowper, Chief Regulatory Officer & Deputy Registrar
  • Kathy Davidson, Executive Director, Strategy, Governance, & Social Accountability
  • Michelle Da Roza, Executive Director, Communications, Change Management, & Organizational Development
  • Chris Smerdon, Director, Licensure
  • Lisa Bannerman, Director, Quality Practice
  • Melanie Journoud, Director, Investigations, Discipline, & Monitoring
  • Susan Paul, Regulatory Transformation Advisor, Quality Practice
  • Lainie Shore, Regulatory Transformation Advisor, Investigations, Discipline, & Monitoring

Careers with CHCPBC

At the College of Health and Care Professionals of BC (CHCPBC), we offer our employees competitive salaries, comprehensive benefits, and support for professional development. We take a strong team-based approach to our work, encouraging open sharing of ideas. We strive for an inclusive and diverse work environment in which everyone feels welcome and engaged and strives to grow.

We welcome your application for staff opportunities listed on this page that match your qualifications. If you’re looking for a job where you can make a difference, consider working in the field of health profession regulation at CHCPBC.

Current postings

We have no job postings at this time.